How To Return Rental Books From Amazon

With the steadily increasing cost of living, where have you reduced expenses.

For us, it has been to limit store visits and use our most gas efficient vehicle and to cut discretionary expenses such as subscriptions and services. Have you found any ways to substantially cut expenses?

We went from two corporate salaries to two modest pensions virtually overnight. What a shock! For pretty much the first time in 30 years we have to think seriously about how we spend. Not fun! Here are some things we did:We got rid of one car. We no longer need two. It cut the insurance in half. We only did this semi-intentionally, but the house we bought is within walking distance of the post office and a shopping center with a large chain grocery store, pizza place, chinese take-out, theater, video rental place, dollar store, drug store, hardware store, and outlet clothing store. We walk everywhere! It has the added benefit of being good for us. We rarely go out to dinner any more. If we eat out at all, it’s more likely to be lunch. We let go all our former helpers (house cleaner, lawn man, snow plower). The lawn at this new house is tiny, it doesn’t snow here, and we have plenty of time to do the house ourselves. We eliminated wines as a hobby. It’s pretty much Yellowtail for us regardless of the occasion Although I didn’t do this primarily to economize, I let my hair grow long. Now it only needs a trim maybe 4 times a year instead of a real cut every 5 weeks. My husband can easily trim an inch off the ends! I color my gray myself for $7 rather than $70 at the salon, although with the disasters I’ve caused, I might try to rebudget the $70! Since neither of us has any health issues, we swapped our high-cost rich health insurance plan for a high deductible major medical-only plan with a health savings account. We self-insure for most routine things in return for a monthly premium that’s about a third the cost of the rich plan. We can opt back in during open enrollment if we need the rich plan before we’re eligible for Medicare and Medigap. Other than non-fiction reference-type books, we’ve stopped buying books. General reading and fiction come from the library. When we do purchase books, I buy used from Amazon Marketplace in “New” or “Like New” condition rather than new, whenever possible. Ditto for DVDs. For the first time ever, Christmas 2007 we each drew one name of a family member to buy presents for, rather than everyone buying for everyone I made it clear to the kids when the family goes out as a big group, we can no longer pick up the entire tab like we used to. The kids are all employed adults and probably have household incomes greater than ours these days! So we go dutch. We rarely purchase “wanted” items any more. We buy only “needed” items. We’ve only been at this for a little over a year. Once we feel comfortable that the budget is sustainable and our savings will last the 30 or 40 years they need to, we might loosen up a bit. Of course by then the cost of living will be even higher so we’ll probably never get to that point!

With the steadily increasing cost of living, where have you reduced expenses.

For us, it has been to limit store visits and use our most gas efficient vehicle and to cut discretionary expenses such as subscriptions and services. Have you found any ways to substantially cut expenses?

We went from two corporate salaries to two modest pensions virtually overnight. What a shock! For pretty much the first time in 30 years we have to think seriously about how we spend. Not fun! Here are some things we did:We got rid of one car. We no longer need two. It cut the insurance in half. We only did this semi-intentionally, but the house we bought is within walking distance of the post office and a shopping center with a large chain grocery store, pizza place, chinese take-out, theater, video rental place, dollar store, drug store, hardware store, and outlet clothing store. We walk everywhere! It has the added benefit of being good for us. We rarely go out to dinner any more. If we eat out at all, it’s more likely to be lunch. We let go all our former helpers (house cleaner, lawn man, snow plower). The lawn at this new house is tiny, it doesn’t snow here, and we have plenty of time to do the house ourselves. We eliminated wines as a hobby. It’s pretty much Yellowtail for us regardless of the occasion Although I didn’t do this primarily to economize, I let my hair grow long. Now it only needs a trim maybe 4 times a year instead of a real cut every 5 weeks. My husband can easily trim an inch off the ends! I color my gray myself for $7 rather than $70 at the salon, although with the disasters I’ve caused, I might try to rebudget the $70! Since neither of us has any health issues, we swapped our high-cost rich health insurance plan for a high deductible major medical-only plan with a health savings account. We self-insure for most routine things in return for a monthly premium that’s about a third the cost of the rich plan. We can opt back in during open enrollment if we need the rich plan before we’re eligible for Medicare and Medigap. Other than non-fiction reference-type books, we’ve stopped buying books. General reading and fiction come from the library. When we do purchase books, I buy used from Amazon Marketplace in “New” or “Like New” condition rather than new, whenever possible. Ditto for DVDs. For the first time ever, Christmas 2007 we each drew one name of a family member to buy presents for, rather than everyone buying for everyone I made it clear to the kids when the family goes out as a big group, we can no longer pick up the entire tab like we used to. The kids are all employed adults and probably have household incomes greater than ours these days! So we go dutch. We rarely purchase “wanted” items any more. We buy only “needed” items. We’ve only been at this for a little over a year. Once we feel comfortable that the budget is sustainable and our savings will last the 30 or 40 years they need to, we might loosen up a bit. Of course by then the cost of living will be even higher so we’ll probably never get to that point!

nuonlinebooks.com Good amharic books

How can an American pick up and move to Mexico.

I’ve been reading some articles about living and/or retiring in Spain or Mexico. There are unbelievable deals on properties in beautiful areas! The question is- What is involved in moving to another country? Do you need to get residency etc. Is home owning the same as here in the U.S.? Or would it actually…

Over a million Americans and Canadians live in Mexico. There’s one large cluster in San Miguel de Allende. See what that looks like here:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MImd1c2M-kAnother large cluster is in the Lake Chapala area. See images here:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rm6HVvTDGs4Some people are “snowbirds.” They just come to Mexico for the winter. You can get a 180 day FM-T (tourist visa); live in your purchased home or rental; then you can return home in six months.Other people are full-time retirees who only go home to visit grandchildren. They live in Mexico on an FM-3 visa which can be renewed yearly for as long as they want to stay.In the interior of the country you can directly own your own home. You can live in it, rent it out, sell it, leave it in your will to your children (just like in the states). But if you want to own coastal property (up to 31 miles from the shore), then you have to set up a bank trust (called a FIDEICOMISO) and pay a yearly fee to continue the trust. But you can still live in it, rent it out, sell it, leave it in your will to your children.So if you’re really interested in retiring to Mexico, start by readind a couple books:Head for Mexico: The Renegade Guide by Don Adamshttp://www.amazon.com/Head-Mexico-Renegade-Don-Adams/dp/1553695623/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247857374&sr=8-1Choose Mexico for Retirement by John Howellshttp://www.amazon.com/Choose-Mexico-Retirement-10th-Information/dp/0762743921/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247857673&sr=8-1Then travel to Mexico and find a town or area you fall in love with.

Is amazon.com promoting copyright infringements.

Okay, I am new to amazon.com and I am trying to sell college textbooks.. One of their policies is that every item sold including CDs and books can be returned up to 30 days of the purchase under the policy. But for all we know the buyers could be violating copyright laws by burning CDs and returning them to the…

Yes, it is clearly infringement of copyright by anyone to lend music for commercial advantage: “in the case of a sound recording in the musical works embodied therein, neither the owner of a particular phonorecord …[nor computer software], may, for the purposes of direct or indirect commercial advantage, dispose of, or authorize the disposal of, the possession of that phonorecord … by rental, lease, or lending, or by any other act or practice in the nature of rental, lease, or lending.”Assuming the “direct or indirect commercial advantage” can be found in there someplace, you would be on to something. Maybe you could argue that having massive sales numbers under your brand is an indirect commercial advantage of accepting a few illegal returns, i.e., their own generous policy actually indicates a loss leader to increase sales by being nice.Letting you take something for a few days, then accepting it back, “for indirect commercial advantage”, would certainly be an “act or practice in the nature of rental, lease or lending.” 17 USC § 109.

College Textbooks..

Hi, I am a sophomore in college and I need to buy textbooks since I return the end of August to begin classes. A lot of the books I need are newer editions and I cannot afford to buy them. (When I came home I could not find a job and my mom has 6 kids and she takes care of us by her lonesome – me and my older…

Often there isn’t that much of a difference. Before buying, look into renting the books. You’d be surprised how many schools do this. Don’t forget to check if your book is listed on Amazon. Their rental prices are very reasonable.

Has anyone used bookrenter.com. How is it. Is it worthwhile.

I need a book for a spring class and I browse the website where there is a website called bookrenter, how is it?

Yes! I rented by daughter’s psychology textbook (she’s in highschool AP) for a 125 day rental and it was half the price of what I would have had to pay from Amazon.com. It would have cost me $100 to by and I rented it for about $54.00.Returning was very easy. You’ll get email and TXT reminders (if you sign up for the TXT) about a week before the rental is due. You go to your account and print out the prepaid shipping labels, put them on the envelope or in a box, and drop it off at a UPS box. You get an email from them as soon as they receive it and check it in. I plan on renting my daughter’s philosphy books for this semester.

which is the best website to rent textbooks.

im a current college student i dont want to pay hunderds of dollars on textbooks that i will most likely not even use. So my question is where or which is the best website to rent textbooks. i Looked up chegg.com if you have some experience with this site please tell me how it went. Also, if you have a different…

I’ve used Chegg before and was completely satisfied with the experience. I saved about 80-90% off of bookstore prices to purchase three textbooks. My books arrived in good condition, and the box was small enough to store easily in my dorm room. Printing out and attaching the return shipping label was easy and I didn’t run into any problems returning them.That said, the best website to rent (or buy) a textbook is wherever you can find that book for the cheapest. Shop around a bit. Get a list of the books you need and check several websites; I look on Chegg, Amazon, Half, and Books-a-Million (mostly for novels but sometimes I can find actual textbooks on there; they have links to third-party sellers with used books for cheaper). This semester, I bought two books from Amazon and one from Half; last semester, I bought all of my books from Amazon.Buying vs renting – if you rent, it’s easier to get rid of books you don’t need anymore because you have to return them. If you buy, especially if you take the time to look around a little, you can potentially get the book for cheaper than a rental and can then sell the book to another student for less than what they’d pay at the bookstore and still make a profit.

How do you know if you rented a book on Amazon.

I’ve gotten some books from Amazon, and some have a sticker on the cover saying that I need to return them to the bookstore or that the book is a rental… I bought the books used and thought I didn’t rent them. Also, on the packages, “Return Service Requested” was listed. Does this mean that I…

There may be something in the Your Account section that will tell you. And if all else fails call customer service and ask them if there’s something else you need to do from here. As for “Return Service Requested” that isn’t something you need to worry about. The following was found online:What you cite is a message to postal authorities, not the intended recipient of the envelope.If the addressed person has moved and the post office has the new address on file, the post office will send that new address back to the sender of the envelope.

Question about Amazon textbook rental.

1). I don’t have Amazon account yet, but do I have to connect with my bank account like pyapla to register for Amazon?2). How do I return the rental book back to Amazon?3). Why Amazon lets people renting, don’t they fear that people just take it and not going to return?I want to rent a book from…

1) either paypal or credit card will work2) you return it by mail3) that’s why they want your credit card information. if you don’t return it, they will just charge your card. Make sure the book you received is in good condition (if you spot major problem, return the book)

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41 thoughts on “How To Return Rental Books From Amazon

  1. Even in those areas there has been cutbacks; less driving & less food, which really helps the weight loss plan.Every family spends money differently. Having been a single, male professional in NYC, I know what dining expenses can do to a budget. Many folks eat out or order in constantly. This can be because of time pressures, culinary ineptitude, or whatever. In my budget, eliminating or radically reducing restaurant (and bar, for those who drink) expenses can have a huge, positive impact on a monthly budget. It comes with a price, though…someone has to cook. In my opinion, the net savings from cooking at home ought to go into the account of the “cook”… 🙂

  2. Here are some other links that may interest you.I’ve been recommending Tobias’ book so much lately, it is sad I am getting no commissions from the publisher… 🙁 I even just bought 3 copies as gifts to family members starting out right after college. Tobias reinforces the useful notion that “a penny saved is two pennies earned”.

  3. I would try out BigWords.com; they are a comparison search engine for textbook rentals! You can check out dozens of sites side by side to make sure that you get the best price. Personally, I prefer TextbookStop.com; they usually offer pretty good prices, plus right now you can use the coupon code “K7234” to get 10% off!

  4. Scenario: Grandma says, “Look, love, I bought you a nice new textbook from that online place you like.”It helps of course to know where your money is going. I have been banking online with Quicken for over 10 years. I know exactly where it is going. Unfortunately, I have already played the “kill the dining out card”.

  5. http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resource…As an employee of BookRenter.com I think it is very worthwhile! Allowing students to rent their books instead of buy drastically reduces the cost of textbooks. If you would like any help or more details please feel free to contact me on twitter at @bookrenter

  6. It helps of course to know where your money is going. I have been banking online with Quicken for over 10 years. I know exactly where it is going. Unfortunately, I have already played the “kill the dining out card”.

  7. No, Amazon won’t be in trouble and they shouldn’t change their policy.im a current college student i dont want to pay hunderds of dollars on textbooks that i will most likely not even use. So my question is where or which is the best website to rent textbooks. i Looked up chegg.com if you have some experience with this site please tell me how it went. Also, if you…

  8. If I had a very large vehicle, I would sell it IMHO. The gasoline prices are what’s killing all of us and they’re not going back down.

  9. More miles between oil changes. Push anything that can be pushed back. Things that can be done on the house are waiting to be fixed at a slower pace.

  10. Grandchild says, “But Grandma, this is for psychiatry and my course is on psychology. I can’t even send it back and change it for the one I need since Amazon changed its policy on returns.”

  11. Haha! In all honesty, I would just run across the border at night! They do that sort of thing ALL the time to come move here…

  12. The thirty day guarantee *can* be abused, yes, but that’s the fault of the few abusers who are in no way the majority of Amazon’s customers.Oh wait.. don’t tell me, you have 10% Cherokee in you?

  13. More miles between oil changes. Push anything that can be pushed back. Things that can be done on the house are waiting to be fixed at a slower pace.

  14. Lights off more, use the library instead of purchasing books. There wasn’t much room to cut expenses to start with.

  15. I WONDER HOW THE NATIVE AMERICANS FEEL ABOUT THE EUROS THAT CAME OVER TO THEIR LAND… AMERICA?In Mexico you don’t have to be a citizen to live there. You will have no real rights though and aside from the tourist areas and the areas designated for retired Americans there is no protection. Recently there have been several kidnappings of Americans in Mexico, be careful.

  16. We try to combine trips in the car, but that hasn’t worked as well as we would like.This Site Might Help You.We try to combine trips in the car, but that hasn’t worked as well as we would like.EDIT: So only people who agree with you are taking the problem seriously? Then don’t ask this question where not everyone shares your world view, dipwad!

  17. There are actual “subdivisions” that cater to Americans. You can look them up on the Internet. Immigrating to another country is not that hard. You need to call the immigration department of the other country and ask them what their procedures are. Most countries do not allow dual citizenship so you may have to renounce your citizenship and become a citizen of the other country.

  18. Even in those areas there has been cutbacks; less driving & less food, which really helps the weight loss plan.Amazon Textbook Rental Return Policy

  19. You need to take your PASSPORT and PROOF OF AN INCOME of $1000 PER MONTH from investments, so you won’t have to WORK in Mexico to live… and take all that to any Mexican CONSULATE and apply for your FM-3 legal alien certification. You will also need all the documents for any car you take in and Mexican insurance. It will cost you about $2000 JUST TO GET INTO MEXICO even with an FM-3.. and DON’T EVEN THINK ABOUT CHEATING… they WILL catch up with you as soon as you are 25 miles from the border and they CAN CONFISCATE YOUR CAR and PUT YOU IN JAIL.Here is a very useful link……………..

  20. If you purchased them used, it’s likely that they used to be part of a book rental program that sold excess copies due to lack of demand. They couldn’t remove the stickers without damaging the cover.

  21. My husband and I have cut back on shopping and are eating out less often. We never did eat out too much. I cook most every night for dinner.Americans pick up and move to Mexico with their retirement money that will go 10X further in Mexico than here in the US.

  22. Every family spends money differently. Having been a single, male professional in NYC, I know what dining expenses can do to a budget. Many folks eat out or order in constantly. This can be because of time pressures, culinary ineptitude, or whatever. In my budget, eliminating or radically reducing restaurant (and bar, for those who drink) expenses can have a huge, positive impact on a monthly budget. It comes with a price, though…someone has to cook. In my opinion, the net savings from cooking at home ought to go into the account of the “cook”… :)Hmmm… to the first 2 comments…..

  23. Lights off more, use the library instead of purchasing books. There wasn’t much room to cut expenses to start with.

  24. Sometimes they are and sometimes they are not–you would have to ask each prof. You can also sometimes find them in the library to use, rent them or share with someone in the class (and I would take all the personal info out of the Q about your mom etc, not necessary and kinda personal)

  25. My husband and I have cut back on shopping and are eating out less often. We never did eat out too much. I cook most every night for dinner.When you start your course all of the students in the year above will put up signs to sell theirs from last year! To be honest, don’t buy loads of textbooks. Unless you actually need it to take and use in every lesson don’t bother. We found that most were written by the lecturers and we never used them. When it comes to your assignments get to the library first and borrow them from the long loan (3 weeks) section. Any others not available reserve them. Then if it comes to your date being up and you can’t renew them on-line as others have reserved them you just don’t take them back, the fines are so stupidly low (except the short loan section) that the fines will cost you nothing compared to buying the books to start with!

  26. OH… and you had better be able to speak more than the 20 words of Spanish that most AmeriKans know.. because YOU WILL BE ON YOUR OWN when you move to Mexico.

  27. I’ve been recommending Tobias’ book so much lately, it is sad I am getting no commissions from the publisher… 🙁 I even just bought 3 copies as gifts to family members starting out right after college. Tobias reinforces the useful notion that “a penny saved is two pennies earned”.http://lrafferty.net

  28. Chegg seems to be a good website. However, there is another alternative to renting textbooks if you want to save money. Submit them to Xoob (www.xoobbooks.com). This website just got launched, but needs people like you to post your unwanted books on there and spread the word (such as on Facebook) to get started. If enough people add their books there, then you could just swap books for free, and get the textbooks you may need in the future for free.

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